Dental sensitivity

Sensitive teeth

Dentinal Hypersensitivity (DH), or Dental Sensitivity, is defined as an intense and transitory dental pain caused by the exposure of the dentin, internal part of the tooth, to the oral environment and which appears after contact with external stimuli: cold, hot, acidic or sweet food or drink;

Sensitive teeth

Dentinal Hypersensitivity (DH), or Dental Sensitivity, is defined as an intense and transitory dental pain caused by the exposure of the dentin, internal part of the tooth, to the oral environment and which appears after contact with external stimuli: cold, hot, acidic or sweet food or drink;


Dental sensitivity

Dental sensitivity occurs when the dentin, which is protected by the gum, root cement and tooth enamel, loses its natural protection and is uncovered.

The dentin contains thousands of microscopic tubes, known as dentinal tubules, which connect the outside of the tooth with the nerve endings. When the tooth loses its protection due to retraction of the gum and/or wear of the tooth enamel, these tubules are left open to the outside, allowing external stimuli to reach the nerve endings and cause the sensation of pain.


Dental sensitivity: causes
  • Brushing teeth inadequately in strength and/or technique
  • Using a very abrasive toothpaste
  • Acidic foods and drinks
  • Excessive chewing force (occlusal trauma, bruxism)
  • Bad patient habits (attrition and/or abfraction)
  • Dental treatments: periodontal (especially surgery) and orthodontics
  • Stomach conditions: ulcer, hiatal hernia, etc.
  • Psychological pathologies: bulimia, anorexia nervosa, etc.
  • Work-related conditions: wine tasters, bakers, etc.
  • Gingival recession
  • Anatomic abnormalities

Dental sensitivity

Pain from dental sensitivity is easily identifiable, as it always appears in the presence of diverse but clearly recognisable stimuli:

  • Very cold or very hot food or beverages
  • Consumption of sweet or acidic substances
  • Toothbrushing
  • When breathing cold air
  • Tactile pressure

If the pain that occurs is not related to a certain stimulus and/or it persists after the stimulus ceases or cannot not be easily located, the cause is likely to not be dental sensitivity and could be due to the existence of underlying conditions, such as, for example, tooth decay.

DENTAID Global

Discover what we are doing worldwide:

DENTAID by countries

Find the latest DENTAID innovations and solutions in each country: